Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia

LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 544--545

Point-of-care nasal ultrasonography: A novel technique using “hockey stick” probe


Chitta R Mohanty1, Vikas Saini2, Sameer Sethi2, Snigdha Bellapukonda3,  
1 Department of Truma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Science, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Science, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chitta R Mohanty
Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Science, Bhubaneswar - 751 019, Odisha
India




How to cite this article:
Mohanty CR, Saini V, Sethi S, Bellapukonda S. Point-of-care nasal ultrasonography: A novel technique using “hockey stick” probe.Saudi J Anaesth 2020;14:544-545


How to cite this URL:
Mohanty CR, Saini V, Sethi S, Bellapukonda S. Point-of-care nasal ultrasonography: A novel technique using “hockey stick” probe. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Aug 4 ];14:544-545
Available from: https://www.saudija.org/text.asp?2020/14/4/544/295993


Full Text



Sir,

Ultrasonography of upper airway has evolved in recent years but there is no mention of any technique for nasal ultrasonography to determine the nasal patency. Although a case was reported by Shah et al., there was no mention of the type of ultrasound probe and the position of the probe during ultrasonography.[1] In the present study, we describe a novel technique for an ultrasound of the nose with the help of the “hockey stick” probe (HSP) to obtain exact image during a routine examination in human volunteers. The small-footprint linear array transducer is also called a hockey-stick transducer and has a higher frequency compared with other transducers.[2] This transducer is used for evaluating small superficial structures as it has better image resolution.[2] It is not used for deeper structures because of its small field of view and limited depth penetration. The position of the probe and parts of the nasal cavity during ultrasonography using HSP is shown in [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. This technique can be helpful for selecting correct nostril for nasotracheal intubation and nasogastric tube insertion. Thus, we have found HSP to be more effective for obtaining better quality image than the linear probe for point-of-care nasal ultrasonography. It can also help to diagnose deviated nasal septum in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.[3],[4]{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Shah SB, Pahade A, Chawla R, Goel N. Ultrasound for predicting the suitable nostril for nasotracheal intubation: Look before you leap! Saudi J Anaesth 2019;13:145-7.
2Saini V, Samra T. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular subclavian cannulation: A novel technique using “hockey stick” probe. J Emerg Trauma Shock 2015;8:72-3.
3Chi SI, Park S, Joo L-A, Shin TJ, Kim HJ, Seo K-S. Identifying the more suitable nostril for nasotracheal intubation using radiographs. J. Dent Anesth Pain Med 2016;16:103-9.
4Gossner J. Sonography of the nasal cartilage: Technique and normal anatomy. J Ultrasound 2014;17:317-9.