Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 323--328

Effect of pneumoperitoneum on dynamic variables of fluid responsiveness (Delta PP and PVI) during Trendelenburg position


Djamal Ghoundiwal1, Amelie Delaporte2, Javad Bidgoli2, Patrice Forget3, Jean-François Fils4, Philippe Van der Linden2 
1 Department of Anaesthesiology, Erasme Hospital, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels, Belgium
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Brugmann Hospital, Place A. Van Gehuchten 4, 1020 Brussels, Belgium
3 Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels, Belgium
4 Statistician, Ars Statistica, Nivelles, Belgium

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Djamal Ghoundiwal
Department of Anaesthesiology, Erasme Hospital, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels
Belgium

Background and Aims: Pulse pressure variation (ΔPP) is considered as one of the best predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients under mechanical ventilation. Pleth Variability Index (PVI) has been proposed as a noninvasive alternative. However, pneumoperitoneum has been recently suggested as a limitation to their interpretation. The aim of this study was to compare changes in ΔPP and PVI related to autotransfusion associated with a Trendelenburg maneuver before and during pneumoperitoneum. Methods: 50 patients undergoing elective abdominal laparoscopic surgery were enrolled in this prospective observational study. All patients were equipped with an invasive radial artery catheter and a PVI probe. After obtaining a stable signal with both ΔPP and PVI, baseline values were recorded, before and after head-down tilts of 10°, with or without abdominal insufflation (10-12 mmHg). All measurements were made before any fluid challenge under standardized anaesthesia, while patients were paralyzed and mechanically ventilated with 8 mL/kg tidal volume. Results: Changes in ΔPP and PVI associated with the Trendelenburg maneuver before and after insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum were significantly different (P < 0.001). In baseline conditions, the Trendelenburg maneuver was associated with a significant decrease in heart rate while mean arterial pressure remained unchanged. Both ΔPP and PVI decreased. After insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum, the Trendelenburg maneuver was associated with a significant decrease in heart rate and ΔPP and an increase in mean arterial pressure while PVI remained unchanged. Conclusion: Pneumoperitoneum did not alter the response of ΔPP to autotransfusion associated with the Trendelenburg maneuver, which was not the case for the PVI. This latter decreased during Trendelenburg maneuver performed alone and remained unchanged during Trendelenburg maneuver performed after insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum.


How to cite this article:
Ghoundiwal D, Delaporte A, Bidgoli J, Forget P, Fils JF, Van der Linden P. Effect of pneumoperitoneum on dynamic variables of fluid responsiveness (Delta PP and PVI) during Trendelenburg position.Saudi J Anaesth 2020;14:323-328


How to cite this URL:
Ghoundiwal D, Delaporte A, Bidgoli J, Forget P, Fils JF, Van der Linden P. Effect of pneumoperitoneum on dynamic variables of fluid responsiveness (Delta PP and PVI) during Trendelenburg position. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2022 Nov 27 ];14:323-328
Available from: https://www.saudija.org/article.asp?issn=1658-354X;year=2020;volume=14;issue=3;spage=323;epage=328;aulast=Ghoundiwal;type=0