Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 38--43

Adductor canal blockade versus continuous epidural analgesia after total knee joint replacement: A retrospective cohort study


Khalid A Alsheikh, Ahmed S Alkhelaifi, Mohammed K Alharbi, Faisal A Alhabradi, Faisal A Alzahrani, Abdulrahman A Alsalim, Ali A Alhandi, Arwa K Aldosary 
 College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences; Department of Orthopedics, Ministry of National Guard – Health Affairs; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Faisal A Alhabradi
King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Ali Al Arini Street, Ar Rimayah, Riyadh 14611 Riyadh
Saudi Arabia

Background: Total knee arthroplasty is associated with intense pain postoperatively. Thus, adequate pain relief is essential in the immediate postoperative period to enable ambulation, initiation of physiotherapy, and prevention of postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness and early outcomes of adductor canal blockade (ACB) and continuous epidural analgesia (CEA) in patients who underwent a unilateral total knee replacement (TKR). Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study that was conducted in Riyadh with 80 patients receiving a unilateral total knee arthroplasty from August 2017 to July 2018. Forty patients received ACB, and 40 received CEA exclusively. The primary outcomes measured were the degree of knee flexion and extension in physiotherapy sessions on postoperative day 1 and discharge, how soon patients walked after surgery, length of hospital stay (LOS), local anesthetic and total opioid consumption, postoperative blood drainage output, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and pain scores. Results: Significantly more patients receiving ACB could flex their knee in the first 24 h postoperatively (P <0.05), and the total drain output was also significantly less (P <0.05). Pain in the first 8, 24, and 48 h was less in the ACB group using a Visual Analog Scale (P <0.05). In addition, LOS, total opioid consumption, postoperative blood drain output, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and pain scores were significantly decreased after using ACB compared with epidural analgesia. Conclusion: This study provided evidence that ACB as postoperative analgesia after TKR is associated with better outcomes in terms of facilitating early functional recovery and mobility, and consequently prevents major postoperative complications.


How to cite this article:
Alsheikh KA, Alkhelaifi AS, Alharbi MK, Alhabradi FA, Alzahrani FA, Alsalim AA, Alhandi AA, Aldosary AK. Adductor canal blockade versus continuous epidural analgesia after total knee joint replacement: A retrospective cohort study.Saudi J Anaesth 2020;14:38-43


How to cite this URL:
Alsheikh KA, Alkhelaifi AS, Alharbi MK, Alhabradi FA, Alzahrani FA, Alsalim AA, Alhandi AA, Aldosary AK. Adductor canal blockade versus continuous epidural analgesia after total knee joint replacement: A retrospective cohort study. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Sep 16 ];14:38-43
Available from: https://www.saudija.org/article.asp?issn=1658-354X;year=2020;volume=14;issue=1;spage=38;epage=43;aulast=Alsheikh;type=0