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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 96

A superior drug delivery system for peripheral nerve block procedures


Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Akshaya N Shetti
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-354X.109849

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Date of Web Publication30-Mar-2013
 


How to cite this article:
Shetti AN. A superior drug delivery system for peripheral nerve block procedures. Saudi J Anaesth 2013;7:96

How to cite this URL:
Shetti AN. A superior drug delivery system for peripheral nerve block procedures. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2013 [cited 2021 Sep 24];7:96. Available from: https://www.saudija.org/text.asp?2013/7/1/96/109849

Sir,

While practicing anesthesia in developing and underdeveloped countries, it is important to consider not only the quality of anesthesia but also the cost-effectiveness. I read the article by Singh et al. where the author mentions cost-effective indigenous drug delivery system for nerve blocks. [1] The mentioned technique is an attempt and concentrated mainly on cost-effectiveness. We do regularly practice peripheral nerve blocks with or without ultrasound guidance. We do take care of cost of each material used. Our technique is more cost-effective, less cumbersome, airtight, easy, takes care of sterility, and is also readily available. We routinely use a male to female pressure monitoring tubing for the delivery of local anesthetic during peripheral nerve block, which is available in various lengths and anesthesiologist can choose depending on comfort. One end of it is connected to needle and the other end to a 20-ml syringe, as shown in the [Figure 1]. We prime the tubing and needle with local anesthetic before we proceed for the block to remove air. The assistant injects the drug from the syringe after negative aspiration for the blood. The operator can hold the needle with great comfort and can concentrate on locating nerve or plexus. This technique saves time, is sterile, uses less resources, is easy, cost-effective, airtight, and readily available.
Figure 1: Arrangement of needle, syringe, pressure monitoring tube

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  References Top

1.Singh P, Gombar SK, Bajaj N. Indigenous drug delivery system for use in nerve blocks. Saudi J Anaesth 2012;6:311.  Back to cited text no. 1
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