GUIDELINES
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 378-382

Electroconvulsive therapy during a highly contagious respiratory pandemic—A framework during COVID-19


1 Professor of Anesthesiology, Professor of Surgery (Sec), Tufts University School of Medicine, Associate Chief of Anesthesia for Research and Development, VA Boston Healthcare System, Department Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA, USA
2 Professor of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Director of Inpatient Services, Tufts Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA, USA
3 Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Director Psychiatry ECT Service, Tufts Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA, USA
4 Visiting Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Vice-Chair for Research, Director, Tufts Anesthesia Research Center, Tufts Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Roman Schumann
Professor of Anesthesiology, Professor of Surgery (Sec), Tufts University School of Medicine, Associate Chief of Anesthesia for Research and Development, VA Boston Healthcare System, Department Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA 02132
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sja.SJA_455_20

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Necessary procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic include electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Providing ECT has been considered an essential service during COVID-19 in the Singapore healthcare system, not least to contribute to disease control within a society in part due to the nature of the ECT patient population. There is limited evidence-based scientific information available regarding a procedural framework for ECT during a respiratory pandemic, when much attention in the healthcare system is focused on different areas of clinical care. This article attempts to describe such a framework for ECT procedures acknowledging limited solid scientific evidence at this time and being mindful of future changes to these suggestions as testing, immunization, and treatment options develop. This approach can be adopted in whole or in part to assist practitioners to protect the patient and themselves during the procedure.


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