ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 152-156

Blood pressure measurements during intraoperative pediatric scoliosis surgery


1 Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA
2 Department of Research, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA
3 Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida, USA
4 Department of Operating Room-CT Surgery, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Lisgelia Santana
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Nemours Children's Hospital, 13535 Nemours Parkway, Orlando . 32827, Florida
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sja.SJA_570_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Intraoperative hypotension is frequently encountered during surgery and it can be associated with adverse outcomes. Blood pressure monitoring is critical during surgery, but there are no universally agreed upon standards for interpreting values of hypotension and no consensus regarding interventions. Material and Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent idiopathic scoliosis surgery by a single surgeon. We used the arterial line for all measures. Intraoperative hypotension was defined as 20% decrease of the baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), 30% decrease of baseline SBP, or mean arterial pressure less than 60 mmHg. Use of vasopressor agents was also recorded and correlated with blood pressure definitions. Results: Seventy idiopathic scoliosis patients were retrospectively evaluated. There was a significant correlation between the three measures of hypotension. Sixty percent of the patients received vasopressors. There was a significant correlation between a drop of mean arterial pressure to less than 60 mmHg and the use of the ephedrine. We did not find any changes on neuromonitoring measures during the case and there were no intraoperative or one-month postoperative complications. Conclusions: Blood pressure is only one of the measures anesthesiologists look to for good perfusion during surgery. Pediatric anesthesiologists and orthopedics agree in trying tight blood pressure control during surgery to decrease blood loss, but what the exact definition of that blood pressure number is, is still unclear. We propose that using mean arterial pressure less than 60 mmHg is perhaps a better definition. We provide recommendations for future studies.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed475    
    Printed52    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded48    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal