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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 414-416

Drug compliance among hypertensive patients in a teaching hospital


Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. A R Alanzi
Intern, College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-354X.177322

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Date of Web Publication21-Sep-2016
 

  Abstract 

Objective: To determine the compliance rate and associated factors among hypertensive patients in a teaching hospital.
Study Design: A cross-sectional study.
Materials and Methods: Ethical approval taken from the Institutional Ethics Committee (No. 00101/9/2013). One hundred adult hypertensive patients were interviewed using a pretested, structured, closed ended questionnaire. Inclusion criteria include all adult hypertensive patients attending outpatient clinic from 1st to 28th November 2013 at King Saud Medical City. Exclusion criteria include only if the patient refuse to participate in the study.
Results: After calculating the compliance of each patient, we found that 63 of the patients had >80% compliance rate. The most common causes of noncompliance were felt good (reported by 59 patients out of 100), simply forgot (56%), had problems taking pills at specified time (55%), and felt asleep through dose time (52%).
Conclusion: The compliance rate with medications was good, but there was a proportion of patients were noncompliant because maybe they need better education and family support.

Keywords: Anti-hypertensive drugs; compliance; hypertension


How to cite this article:
Alanzi A R, Aldohayan D A, Alsohaim A F, Alqumaizi K I. Drug compliance among hypertensive patients in a teaching hospital. Saudi J Anaesth 2016;10:414-6

How to cite this URL:
Alanzi A R, Aldohayan D A, Alsohaim A F, Alqumaizi K I. Drug compliance among hypertensive patients in a teaching hospital. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Dec 6];10:414-6. Available from: http://www.saudija.org/text.asp?2016/10/4/414/177322


  Introduction Top


Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that the overall age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension among the U.S. adults aged 18 and over was 28.6% in 2009-2010; 81.9% were aware of their hypertension and 76.4% were currently taking medication to control their high blood pressure.[1],[2] The prevalence of hypertension was similar for men and women at nearly one-third. The prevalence increased with age and was highest among older adults.[3] According to a community-based study conducted by a major national study on coronary artery disease among Saudis study, the prevalence of hypertension was 26.1%.[4] In a similar study in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia, the compliance rate was only 53.0%.[5] Our study aimed to determine the compliance rate and associated factors among hypertensive patients in King Saud Medical City.


  Materials and Methods Top


In a cross-sectional study over 4 weeks period conducted among outpatient clinic at King Saud Medical City, 100 adult, hypertensive patients of both sexes, were recruited. Inclusion criteria were all adult hypertensive patients attended the outpatient clinic at King Saud Medical City in November 2013. Patients who refused to participate in the study were excluded.

Data collection tool was a pretested, structured, mostly closed-ended questionnaire administered by interview. Information obtained included sociodemographic characteristics, patient's reported compliance, and the reasons for noncompliance.

Ethical consideration

Ethical approval was taken from the Institutional Ethics Committee (No. 00101/9/2013), and written consent is taken from all participants.


  Results Top


One hundred hypertensive patients (74 males) were studied. The mean age was 56 year (range: 30-90 years). Almost two-thirds of the patients had only elementary education (60%) followed by high school (15%). About 57% of the patients were known hypertensive >5 year, 18% <2 year, and 25% between 2 and 5 years. About 88% claimed that they are taking their drugs regularly. To evaluate the compliance of the patients, we gave marks for each question in the questionnaire and after calculating the compliance of each patient we found that 63 of the patients had >80% compliance rate [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Compliance rate among hypertensive patients in a teaching hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. To evaluate the compliance, we gave marks for each question in the questionnaire and after calculating the compliance of each patient we found that 63 of the patients had >80% compliance rate

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The most common causes of noncompliance are shown in [Figure 2].
Figure 2: The most common causes of noncompliance to anti-hypertensive medications were felt good (reported by 59 patients out of 100), simply forgot (56%), had problems taking pills at specified time (55%) and felt asleep through dose time (52%)

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  Discussion Top


In our study, patients between 40 and 49 years showed the best compliance while between 80 and 89 years were the worst and those with high education level showed better compliance. Looking at compliance with the treatment duration, we found that patients who use drugs <5 years were more likely to be compliant while those with longer duration tend to be less compliant.

In Saudi Arabia, we found only one study to estimate the compliance rate and associated factors among a population of hypertensive subjects registered in hospitals and primary health care centers in Tabuk. The compliance rate was 53.0%. It was associated positively with male sex, and negatively with older age, symptoms of illness and drug side effects. The degree of blood pressure control was worse among noncompliant subjects. Reasons for noncompliance included the asymptomatic nature of hypertension, a shortage of drugs, side effects, forgetfulness, and lack of health education.[5]

We think in our study the compliance was higher than the above studies because of the availability of free drugs to the patients and easy accessibility to health centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.


  Conclusion Top


The compliance rate with medications was good, but there is a proportion of patients were noncompliant because maybe they need better education and family support.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Whitworth JA; World Health Organization, International Society of Hypertension Writing Group. 2003 World Health Organization (WHO)/International Society of Hypertension (ISH) statement on management of hypertension. J Hypertens 2003;21:1983-92.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Hypertension among adults in the United States, 2009-2010.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Hypertension among adults in the United States, 2011-2012.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Al-Nozha MM, Abdullah M, Arafah MR, Khalil MZ, Khan NB, Al-Mazrou YY, et al. Hypertension in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Med J 2007;28:77-84.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Khalil SA, Elzubier AG. Drug compliance among hypertensive patients in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. J Hypertens 1997;15:561-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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  IN THIS Article
   Abstract
  Introduction
   Materials and Me...
  Results
  Discussion
  Conclusion
   References
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