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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 109-110

A failure to reach statistical significance - Magnesium sulfate pretreatment did not reduce the incidence of propofol injection pain


1 Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatic, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA
2 Department of Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Richard E Galgon
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, B6/319, Madison, Wisconsin 53597
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-354X.109860

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Date of Web Publication30-Mar-2013
 


How to cite this article:
Wang S, Galgon RE, Schroeder KM. A failure to reach statistical significance - Magnesium sulfate pretreatment did not reduce the incidence of propofol injection pain. Saudi J Anaesth 2013;7:109-10

How to cite this URL:
Wang S, Galgon RE, Schroeder KM. A failure to reach statistical significance - Magnesium sulfate pretreatment did not reduce the incidence of propofol injection pain. Saudi J Anaesth [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Dec 13];7:109-10. Available from: http://www.saudija.org/text.asp?2013/7/1/109/109860

Sir,

We read with interest the article by Singh et al.[1] reporting a comparative study of the effects of granisetron, magnesium sulfate, and nitroglycerine for the reduction of propofol injection pain. The authors report that all three drugs reduced the incidence and intensity of propofol injection pain compared to the control solution (0.9% normal saline) with the order of effectiveness being granisetron > nitroglycerin > magnesium sulfate > control. We agree with the authors statistical findings when testing amongst all groups is performed at each of the study time points following propofol injection (i.e., 5, 10, 15, and 20 seconds). However, when pairwise tests are performed using either the authors' reported method (Chi-square test) or the more appropriate Fisher's exact test, given the relatively small number of study subjects per group, the differences in the incidence of propofol injection pain for subjects receiving magnesium sulfate compared to normal saline fail to reach statistical significance at any of the time points [Table 1]. In this regard, we disagree with the authors' conclusion suggesting that magnesium sulfate pretreatment reduces the incidence of propofol injection pain. It would be beneficial for readers to have the authors address this issue or provide further details regarding their statistical analyses.
Table 1: Pairwise comparison-magnesium sulfate vs. control

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  References Top

1.Singh KD, Jindal P, Singh G. Comparative study of attenuation of the pain caused by propofol intravenous injection by granisetron, magnesium sulfate, and nitroglycerine. Saudi J Anaesth 2011;5:50-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
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