ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 48-52

Effect of fluid preloading on postoperative nausea and vomiting following laparoscopic cholecystectomy


1 Department of Anesthesia, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Anesthesia, National Guard Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Abdelazeem El-Dawlatly
Riyadh 11461, P.O. Box 2925
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-354X.57872

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Background: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common complication following general anesthesia. Different regimens have been described for the treatment of PONV with few that mention the prevention of it. Therefore, we conducted this study to compare the effect of preloading with either crystalloids or colloids on the incidence of PONV following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 80 patients who underwent LC. The patients were divided into four groups (each 20 patients), to receive preloading of intravenous fluid, as follows: Group 1 received, 10 ml/kg of low-MW tetrastarch in saline (Voluven TM ), group 2 received, 10 ml/kg medium-MW pentastarch in saline (Pentaspan TM ), group 3, received 10 ml/kg of high-MW heta-starch in saline (Hespan TM ), and group 4, received 10 ml/kg Lactated Ringer's, and this was considered as the control group. All patients received the standard anesthetic technique. The incidence of PONV was recorded, two and 24 hours following surgery. The need for antiemetics and/or analgesics was recorded postoperatively. Results: The highest incidence of PONV was in group 3 (75% of the patients) compared to the other three groups. Also the same trend was found with regard to the number of patients who needed antiemetic therapy. It was the highest incidence in group 3 (70%), followed by group 2 (60%), and then group 1(35%), and the least one was in the control group (25%). Conclusion: Intravascular volume deficits may be a factor in PONV and preloading with crystalloids showed a lower incidence of PONV.


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